Melanotaenia praecox

Here is a short video of some rainbow fish spawning, which they do every morning within a few hours of the light coming on.  I am not trying to save any eggs, so I have not put a mop in the tank, and the bows are laying eggs in the roots of the Anubias nana growing under the driftwood.  The German blue rams sneak in and steal the eggs, but new eggs are very sticky and the rams do not like them.  After a few hours the eggs lose their sticky coating and the rams will eat them all.

4 Comments

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4 Responses to Melanotaenia praecox

  1. joe

    Great looking preacox ! I see you keep them with some rams. Do you ever keep them with other rainbows? I have a school of praecox and I’m thinking of adding a school of some other bows. great videos.

    • tjudy

      Mixing rainbows is not a problem so long as you are not collecting eggs. I like to pair large schools (11 – 13) of a small species, like M. praecox, with a smaller group (5-7) of a large species, like Chilatherina fasciatus, in big planted tanks.

      • joe

        So, you don’t have any problems with the bigger species bullying the little guys? Say in a 75 gal planted tank? I’ve seen pictures of the C. fasciatus, that would be an awesome tank if they all got along , I guess they do since you mentioned it. Good excuse to upgrade from my 55 to a 75.
        by the way what kind of lighting do have in the tank in the video? The fish look great?

        • tjudy

          One of the secrets to keeping rainbows in mixed groups (and barbs and tetras for that matter) is to make sure that there are enough fish of each species for them to worry about each other and not pick on the other species. Keep in mind that most rainbows will hybridize, regardless of their genus, so do nto plan to collect eggs from rainbow community tanks. The lighting over the 20H in the video are two 24″ T5 bulbs (a 10,000K and 6500K) which are what grows the plants, and a UPG LED fixture (not one of the reef-ready models) which provides a great quality of light for video… but not so good for plants.

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