Out of the Old… Into the New!

Here is a first glimpse of TedsFishroom 3.0.  I am moving my hobby out of the warehouse and back into my basement…

New Peru Order

A new import from Peru arrived last week with a lot of cool fish that I have not brought in before.  The price lists are updated on the livestock page.  Here are some of the highlights:

Corydoras stenocephalus – Rio Ucayali

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Corydoras cf. semiaquilus – Rio Napo

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Corydoras orcesi

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Elachocharax pulcher

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Trochilocharax ornatus

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Hyphessobrycon sp. ‘bleeding blue’

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Hyphessobrycon ‘red’

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Lots of splash tetras…

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Candelita tetra

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Odontocharacidium aphanes

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I have not started photographing the Apistogramma yet, but new fish include:

  • 3 different locations of A. cacatuoides
  • A. nijsseni
  • A. sp. Oregon
  • A. pantalone
  • A. bitaeniata ‘Rio Yavari’
  • A. atahualpa
  • A. alphuayo
  • A. baenschi
  • A. paulmueller ‘Apache’
  • A. ortagai ‘papagayo’

There are also some oddball catfish:  Helogenes marmoratus, Myoglanis koepckei & Denticetopsis seducta

And… because lots of you have asked for them….  more red wolf fish!  Erythrinus erythrinus

Feeding Time!

I love to feed fish.  I think that we all do.  I especially like it when the fish I am feeding are aggressive on the food, and the best food for that is live black worms.  Here is a video of several of my dwarf cichlids I have set up in spawning tanks getting a treat.  I feed black worms a couple times each week to the fish that can handle them.  You will see some Congochromis sabinae and some Nanochromis splendens getting some worms, but those fish only get them every other week or so: and even then they do not get many.  The apistos can handle the worms though, and in the immortal words of the incomparable Charley Grimes, ‘Nothing like worms to eggs in a belly.’

The tanks are all 10-gallon set up for breeding.  All the structure is in the back, away from the light.  The spawning site that I hope the fish use is visible from the front.  I use yarn mops in dwarf cichlid tanks for a couple reasons.  A fish being picked on can hide very well buried in a mop, and when that mop is mature it will be loaded with infusoria for the fry to eat.  I also use wood, magnolia leaves and live plants (potted crypts and free-floating java moss) for structure.  The filter is in the back corner, which makes it another place a fish can find refuge under.  There is only a little sand on the bottom.  Lighting is very dim (which is why some of the video resolution sucks).  The magnolia leaves add tannin, but sometimes they make the water cloudy, which you will see in a couple tanks.  After a week and a few water changes, however, the tank will clear.  I also use alder cones, which add some antiseptic chemicals to the water.

The tanks all start with two pairs or two trios.  After a few weeks I will remove any fish that are obviously not handling aggression.  By the time fry start to appear, most tanks have a pair or a trio.  There is a tank in the video with some A. kelleri, which cannot stay in a 10-gallon tank forever.  This is one of the mouthbrooding species, and it gets BIG.

Ted’s NEW Fishroom – Aquariums & Racks

There are many factors that you need to consider when planning a new fish room, but one of the first is to decide what size tanks are needed and a lay out for the racks (at least a rough layout… the final result rarely fits exactly).  The numbers and sizes of the tanks will define the racks, which in turn will guide the layout.  The other systems are dependent upon that.  Think of the aquariums and racks as the functional skeleton of the fish room.  It is the framework around which the rest of the room will be built.  Here is a video about the tank sizes I used, the racks I built for them and how they are laid out in the room to make use of space.

 

The New & Improved Ted’s Fishroom!

Here we go…  it has not been a secret that I had to tear down my old fish room and build a new one, but I have not been posting much specifically about the new space.  This is the first video in the New Fish Room series.  Enjoy…

Aquarium Racks in a Fish Room

Finally!  Episode 5 of the Ted’s Fishroom series.  Sorry to take so long, but the trip to Gabon and subsequent trips all over the place put me behind in making videos.  This installment is about building racks for aquariums.  I use three different types of racks: wood, commercial shelving and angle-iron aquarium stands.  The video talks about each briefly and then goes into detail about how to build a basic stand with dado joints.  One thing I mention is the cost effectiveness of wood stands.  I priced a 24″ metal aquarium stand this week, and was quoted $65.99 (retail).  The stand that you will see me make in the video has a total cost of $7.35 in materials….  enjoy.